Challenges ahead for the Canal

 
937Views 5Comments Posted 01/01/2020

We celebrate - with abundant and justified reasons - the twentieth anniversary of the transfer of the Canal to Panamanian hands. Since then, our people have received more economic benefits than in the entire history of the road under the United States administration. In addition, for years, Panamanians managed to modernize several of their operations and facilities, including their successful expansion. Nothing fills us with more pride than seeing each one of the plans elaborated to maintain the commercial validity not only of the Canal, but of the route. But the challenges are far from over. Making the Channel a source of alternative and complementary businesses is another objective of the current administration, while simultaneously Alternatives are sought to meet the growing demand for water in the operations of the interoceanic canal and the needs of the growing population of the metropolitan area. To this, we must add efforts to counteract the effects of climate change, which can become risks for the existing route, as well as for the operation of the current Canal. Now is the time to celebrate, but without forgetting that we have responsibilities ahead.-LA PRENSA, Jan 1.

 



Comments 5

user
GULICKGRINGO

We GRINGOS, or NORTEAMERICANOS prohibited chopping and removal of trees in the old CANAL ZONE. Has Panama done the same?

1 month ago
user
jcrew

Captain is spot on with his analysis. The Northern pole route is gonna be a game changer and Russia is positioning for that. You see global warming has an upside after all.

1 month ago
user
Captain

When the original canal was built it was designed to be capable of handling most vessels for nearly 100 years. The current expanded addition was “redundant” the day it opened. The maximum size vessel that can go through it is a 14,000 TEU container ship whereas most of the worlds fleets have been around 18,000 TEU for many years with the newest at 24,000 containers (TEU) There was no proper local planning involved to ensure canal capacity could handle existing tonnage at the time ...never mind the fact the fleet size is nearly double the max capacity of the new expansion. This was made clear to the canal bosses at the time but they ignored this advice. Its why the practise of stuffing the canal board with political appointees is so wrong. They have pretty much zero experience of the maritime industry and this is the result. Panama has nothing to be proud of when it comes to proper planning of canal development. The apparent decision to stick yet another port at the entrance to the Balboa locks is another appalling decision if in fact ratified. The congestion is already bad at that location this might finally bring operations into severe jeopardy Forma country strategic angle we should now be diversifying away from reliance on canal revenues anyway ..mining? The opening of a soon to be year round route over the northern pole will take 2 to 3 weeks off Asian passages to Europe . Planning for this eventuality should already be in place

1 month ago
user
Rob

It would be laughable if it wasn't so pathetic that the blame for increased water needs by the canal defaults to climate change according to La Prensa.

1 month ago
user
panama

the first thing panama needs to do is put water meters on every house .with the flat rate system there is no need to fix a leaking pipe or a tap that drips . its time to make the people responsible for the water they use

1 month ago
The comments are the responsibility of each author who freely expresses his opinion and not that of Newsroom Panama.
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